Troogle

Secret Google’s CEO meeting at Hotel Amsterdam – June 17 2009

Posted in Action, Events, Secret by whuup on June 16, 2009

The Bilderberg Hotel is definitely tomorrow the place to be for people who want to know the truth. Rumours on several inside blogs and email conversations announce a meeting TOMORROW (the 17th of June) in the Bilderberg Hotel in Amsterdam of some international Google ‘heads’ to discuss.. well that’s a bit unclear.

We have some evidence that there is something going on. Something where not only Google, but also Microsoft, the World Wide Web Consortium and several other computer industry companies are involved.. WHY are they doing this in the Netherlands??

Let me say this: we WILL be there. I suggest you do too. We’ll let you know what we find out what they are actually doing there.

Poll: Do you think Google is abusing your personal information?

Posted in General by igortinbergen on June 12, 2009
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Watch Out, Oracle: Google Tests Cloud-based Database

Posted in News, Publications, Web by henrydewaag on June 12, 2009

Google has released an early version of a new type of database whose approach to data management will be revolutionary, according to an analyst who has studied the technology behind it.

On Tuesday, Google quietly announced in its research team blog a new online database called Fusion Tables designed to sidestep the limitations of conventional relational databases.

Specifically, Fusion Tables has been built to simplify a number of operations that are notoriously difficult in relational databases, including the integration of data from multiple, heterogenous sources and the ability to collaborate on large data sets, according to Google.

“Without an easy way to offer all the collaborators access to the same server, data sets get copied, emailed and ftp’d — resulting in multiple versions that get out of sync very quickly,” reads the Google announcement, which has been largely overlooked, probably because it was made on the same day the company held a high-profile press event to launch its Google Apps Sync for Microsoft Outlook.

Under the hood of Fusion Tables is data-spaces technology, which will make conventional databases go the way of the rotary phone, according to Stephen E. Arnold, a technology and financial analyst who is president of Arnold Information Technology.

Data spaces as a concept has been around since the early 1990s, and Google, realizing its potential, has been developing it since it acquired Transformic, a pioneer of the technology, in 2005, Arnold said.

Data-spaces technology seeks to solve the problem of the multiple data types and data formats that reside in organizations, which have to scrub the data and make it uniform, often at great cost and effort, in order to store and analyze it in conventional databases.

Data spaces envisions a system that creates an index that provides access to data in its disparate formats and types, solving what Arnold calls the “Tower of Babel” problem.

In the case of Fusion Tables, the technology should allow Google to add to the conventional two-dimensional database tables a third coordinate with elements like product reviews, blog posts, Twitter messages and the like, as well as a fourth dimension of real-time updates, he said.
“So now we have an n-cube, a four-dimensional space, and in that space we can now do new kinds of queries which create new kinds of products and new market opportunities,” said Arnold, whose research about this topic includes a study done for IDC last August.

“If you’re IBM, Microsoft and Oracle, your worst nightmare is now visible. Google is going to automatically construct data spaces and implement new types of queries,” he said. “Those guys are going to be blindsided.”

Fusion Tables is an early version of the product, as evidenced by its “Labs” label, which means Google considers it an experimental product. “As usual with first releases, we realize there is much missing, and we look forward to hearing your feedback,” Google’s blog post reads.

Juan Carlos Perez, IDG News Service

Yahoo CEO Keeps Microsoft Deal Door Open, Shuts Out AOL

Posted in News, Secret, Web by henrydewaag on June 8, 2009

SAN FRANCISCO (Dow Jones)–Yahoo Inc. (YHOO) Chief Executive Carol Bartz said Monday the struggling Internet giant can “take on” rivals Microsoft Corp. (MSFT) and Google Inc. (GOOG), and she dismissed the idea of striking a partnership with Time Warner Inc.’s (TWX) AOL unit.

Bartz, however, declined to rule out a search partnership with Microsoft, which tried to buy Yahoo last year and remains open to some sort of deal that could bolster its search capabilities to compete with market leader Google.

“If you talk about search in general, you could partner with somebody,” she said in an interview with Fox Business News’ Liz Claman.

Bartz’s statement appeared to be her latest attempt to calibrate her position on Microsoft. She told an investor conference last week that Yahoo’s future would be “cleaner” if it didn’t strike any sort of deal with Microsoft, a comment that sent Yahoo shares tumbling 5%.

Bartz and Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer have talked about forming a partnership on search but the exact nature of those discussions has not been clear.

Bartz also appeared to rule out any sort of partnership with AOL, which Time Warner recently decided to spin off.

“Yahoo-AOL would not happen anytime in the forever future,” she said. “Yahoo is a much stronger property in a different direction and there’s no sense confusing all of that.”

Bartz once again downplayed Microsoft’s newly revamped search engine, dubbed Bing, which for a day surpassed Yahoo in market share.

Yahoo is the No. 2 U.S. search engine, with 20.4% market share in April, according to market research group comScore. Microsoft continued to lag far behind with about 8% of the market, while rival Google Inc. (GOOG) increased its share by half a percentage point in April to 64.2% of the U.S. market, its highest level ever.
Shares in Yahoo closed down 2.7% at $16.19, while Microsoft fell 0.4% to $22.05. Google shares fell 1.3% to $438.77 and Time Warner was up 2.4% at $25.91.

By Scott Morrison, Dow Jones Newswires; 415-765-6118; scott.morrison@dowjones.com

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Typo’d Google domains in Top 10 malware exploit sites

Posted in Web by whuup on June 5, 2009

typogoogle1Misspelled versions of two popular Google services are among the Top 10 sites hosting exploits for use in drive-by malware download attacks. Of these domains more than 1,400 were hosted in the China’s .cn top level domain.  Several contained plays on the name of Google such as goooogleadsence.biz and googleanalystics.net. Some sources say ten of thousands of hijacked sites that are referring to Google (or third party websites) are  launching attacks via the browser.

So, think twice before visiting a website which you typed (or clicked!) that is from Google. Maybe you shouldn’t visit Google anymore.

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Google dominates your mobile phone

Posted in Mobile by whuup on May 29, 2009

Well, everything that was Google-free is now Google-polluted, even your mobile phone. They think you can use Google to browse the internet and even work in Google Chrome on your mobile. But their mobile marketing can be irritating. Google is so overwhelming in lots of applications for your mobile phone or PDA that people might think they don’t have a choice.

Excessive amount of people hating chinese eh? Well Google does!

Posted in General, Problems by igortinbergen on April 8, 2009

Even when seeing this, people still question wether Google is the biggest search engine out there. There’s a ton of weird information out there about every subject. The suggestions Google makes when you’re searching for something can get weird results, as you can see in the movies below.

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Bad news for Google

Posted in Gadgets, General, Problems by igortinbergen on March 20, 2009

At the time, when Google Desktop Search is already competing with big players like Yahoo, MSN, AskJeeves, Gartner has just made the going even tougher.

Don’t use Google desktop search in your business, warns Gartner. Google Desktop Search has great potential for business use. Its security problems and lack of corporate-ready functions, however, make it unsuitable for widespread use right now.

googledesktop

Gartner has warned that companies shouldn’t use the new Google Desktop Search tool because of security concerns and a lack of features. In a three-page research document, the authors – Whit Andrews, Maurene Grey and David Smith – say the tool that was released in beta in October is “not the proper search tool for businesses right now”.

Instead they reiterate concerns put forward by the CEO of Google rival Copernic, David Burns, two months ago: “Google’s ‘Consent to Collect Nonpersonal Information’ states that GDS collects non-personal data; however, the policy is a one-sided contract in that the user must trust that Google will make the right decisions as to what it will collect.”

However, it also doesn’t offer enough features and for it to recommend Google it would want to see “greater customisation of interface, flexibility for visualisation of results, groupwide administration and index load-balancing”.

This is certainly not good news for Google at a time when its biggest competitor MSN desktop search is getting better reviews. Preston Gralla of Oreilly writes:

Google may be the ultimate Web searcher, but when it comes to finding things on your computer, the just-released beta of MSN Desktop Search beats it hands-down.

That’s because Microsoft’s search tool has been built specifically to search through emails and documents, and so it lets you fine-tune your search in ways that Google doesn’t. So if you’re looking for a specific piece of email, for example, you can search by folder, by sender, by date, by size of file attachments, and more – and you can combine them all for exceedingly fine-tuned searches.

Additionally, MSN Desktop Search has an interface that lets you easily sort and resort your results, and lets you right-click on any result, and then take actions on the file from a pop-up menu – the same pop-up menu that appears when you right-click in Windows Explorer.

There are a lot of other nifty extras in it as well. It can sit as a box in your Taskbar for example, and when you want to do a search, type your search into the box, and results pop up, menu-style. Click on any result to get straight to the file or email.

Google’s search tool, on the other hand, uses the Web search paradigm. You can fine-tune it in ways you would when searching the Web, but not in ways you’d like to when looking for files or email on your hard disk. The interface is bare-bones Google, which is fine for the Web, but not suited for when you’re looking for files, and then working with them on your PC.

Don’t expect either of these search tools to change drastically. Google has applied the Web approach to searching and applied it to your computer. Microsoft instead applied what it knows about Windows, Outlook, and documents. And the winner, without a doubt, is Microsoft.

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Hackers poison PCs that Google “March Madness”

Posted in General, News, Technics by henrydewaag on March 18, 2009

Cybercriminals have begun poisoning Google search results to misdirect sports fans looking to participate in March Madness festivities, security firms say. Websense has found poisoned “search engine optimization” results mixed in with legit results for Google searches on “March Madness schedule,” “March Madness brackets,” and “2009 NCAA bracket predictions.”

This story explains how poisoned SEO results can re-direct your browser to a website serving up all sorts of malicious programs. SEO attacks have become very popular with cyber gangs who specialize in redirecting you to online pitches to buy worthless antispyware subsctiptions for $50. Most often the bad guys will also turn your PC into an obedient bot, and steal all of your sensitive data.

“Cybercriminals specifically take advantage of events like March Madness, because they know consumers are actively looking for brackets to download, the best teams to fill in and pools to participate in,” said Carol Carpenter, vice president of consumer marketing for Trend Micro. “These crooks are smart and know what people are searching for throughout the year. We advise all consumers that they should always keep their anti-virus software protection up-to-date to prevent all infections.”

Good advice. But keeping your antivirus subcription current won’t fully protect you. The bad guys have gotten very good at staying one-step ahead of the latest antivirus updates.

To truly stay safe while surfing the Internet you need to do your homework and be ready to give up convenience. There are numerous consumer tools designed to assess the goodness of the Web page you are about to click to, and tell you whether it’s safe. AVG, ScanSafe, McAfee and Enigma have consumer web scanning tools and services worth checking out.

And here’s a tip: WinPatrol offers very powerful protection. It’s a terrific free tool, popular with techies since it was created 10 years ago by Bill Pytlovany, one of the original designers of AOL and a longtime open-source practitioner. The premier version, called WinPatrol Plus, costs just $30 for a lifetime subscription, which includes all updates, and is designed for the average consumer. WinPatrol takes a snapshot of your Windows run registry, and from then on blocks and alerts you to any new executable program, such as a malicious backdoor, that tries to install itself on your hard drive.

By Byron Acohido

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Google ex-employees launch search engine rival Cuil

Posted in Innovation, Technics by henrydewaag on February 7, 2009

A new search engine has been launched by some of Google’s former engineers, to rival their ex-employer’s market leading product. The engineers claim that Cuil can index, faster and more cheaply, a far larger portion of the web than Google can.

The new search engine says its service goes beyond prevailing search techniques that focus on web links and traffic patterns, instead analysing the context of each page and the concepts behind each user search request.

“Our significant breakthroughs in search technology have enabled us to index much more of the internet,
placing nearly the entire web at the fingertips of every user,” said Tom Costello, Cuil co-founder and chief executive.

According to Danny Sullivan, web search analyst and editor-in-chief of Search Engine Land, Cuil could exploit complaints that consumers may have with Google, such as the fact it tries to do too much, its results favour already popular sites, and that it leans heavily on certain authoritative sites, such as Wikipedia.

“The time may be right for a challenger,” Sullivan said. “Competing with Google is still a very daunting task, as Microsoft will tell you,” he added.

According to Anna Patterson, founder of Cuil and former architect of Google’s TeraGoogle index of web pages, Cuil has indexed a 120 billion web pages, three times more than what they say Google currently indexes. She also claims that the company has spent just £2.5 million developing the search engine.

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Hi all!

Posted in General by igortinbergen on February 1, 2009

The first post in history of this weblog. We’ll update you as soon as possible with all the information regarding Google and the truth about it… sounds a little spooky? Well, we’ll see. Please comment and visit us again!

We’ll found out where this ends!

John ‘Whuup’ Nijenroode
Henry de Waag
Igor Tinbergen
William ‘Astromaniac’ van Urken