Troogle

Google is Evil? According to Joseph Farah it is…

Posted in Web by astromanic on May 9, 2009
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Google censors delete Alex Jones (Infowars) channel on youtube

Posted in Web by astromanic on May 5, 2009

youtube_siteYou Tube has once again proven itself to be a corporate gatekeeper working to destroy free speech and the alternative media after it suspended the popular ‘Alex Jones Channel’ – primarily because Alex Jones showed a print out of a news article during a live show.

The Alex Jones Channel, started by a fan but since embraced as the “official” Alex Jones micro-site on You Tube, has routinely featured in the website’s most popular ranking charts and has collectively attracted millions of views for videos painstakingly catalogued and uploaded over the past two years.

Those videos are now completely gone after You Tube bosses deleted the channel, primarily because the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette complained that Alex Jones had shown a computer print out of one of their articles about the Poplawski cop killer incident last month.

To claim that showing a print out of an article is a violation of copyright is of course completely insane – not a day goes by without TV news anchors showing newspaper stories on live television. Indeed, C-Span’s popular Washington Journal program almost entirely consists of the host showing clippings of newspaper stories every morning.

The real reason for the deletion in undoubtedly the fact that Alex Jones has been on the forefront of exposing stories that have later become major national scandals, such as the MIAC report. Our coverage of the swine flu hoax has again propelled us to the top of the video ranking charts and this no doubt had You Tube’s corporate owners Google running scared. As we have previously documented – Google has intimate ties with the CIA and the military-industrial complex.

To counter such egregious censorship, we are encouraging everyone to subscribe to and bookmark the new Infowarrior channel and alert people to the fact that this will be the new home for Alex Jones on You Tube (at least until they invent a reason to pull that one too).

Visit The New Channel

YouTube is engaged in a hunting expedition against Alex Jones and other truth tellers. Truth is no longer acceptable on the site as it transforms itself into a pale reflection of Hulu, a site owned and operated by NBC Universal (GE) and Fox Entertainment Group (News Corp), that is to say a joint venture by a corporation owned by a death merchant (GE manufactures attack helicopters and jet engines) and a disinformation platform owned by a notorious neocon, Rupert Murdoch.

In the Hulu-ized universe, there is no room for truth or alternative media — all channels will contain the same schlock and mindless pablum already available on cable and broadcast television.

YouTube, the emerging Hulu-ized version, has no use for Alex Jones and has specifically targeted him because his videos invariably draw a large (in the millions) number of people. His message is not welcome in a commercial space dominated by Wall Street bankers and the “entertainment” transnational corporations they own, operate, and use to disseminate their opiated propaganda.

YouTube is owned by Google, the mega-internet corporation that has as its motto “Don’t be evil.” Of course, for Google evil is a relative matter, especially when it comes to the corporation’s removal or omission of information from its services, especially in the totalitarian gulag of China.

Google is infamous for its politically motivated removal of information. In February 2003, Google stopped showing the adverts of Oceana, a non-profit organization protesting a major cruise ship operation’s sewage treatment practices. In October 2007, Google banned advertisements from Maine U.S. Senator Susan Collins’ reelection campaign because she criticized the Soros operation MoveOn.org. In April 2008, Google refused to run ads for a UK Christian group opposed to abortion.

In addition to taking down Alex Jones videos, YouTube has blocked videos produced by Wael Abbas, an activist who posted videos of police brutality, and the American Life League which is critical of Planned Parenthood.

YouTube has its agenda… and it fits in snugly with the agenda of the New World Order.

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Google Knows What You’re Thinking

Posted in Background, Blogs, Technics by whuup on April 27, 2009

“Search engines use GET because you can bookmark the search, link the search, and pass data inside the link. However, your search terms end up on the same line as your IP address in standard web logs all over the world with the GET method. This is “referrer” information, which is available to the distant webmaster every time you click on a link from a search results page. The webmaster knows that someone at your IP address accessed his page, and also knows what you were thinking from your search terms”.

And it is from 2002, think about what Google improved at this point… Mr Brandt is quite a long time doing good things, isn’t he?

Google is working on some spooky things

Posted in Publications, Web by whuup on April 24, 2009

Today, several news websites reported that Google is working together with a couple of other ‘great’ companies. Google and Microsoft working together? Yes, they can. It is called the ‘Google Commission’ for now, since Google took the initiative. The project, which will take several years of development, is about ‘re-arranging’ the web in it’s final form. These monopolistic companies think that they can improve web languages such as HTML6 and CSS4 into super languages, that can work via the ‘Clarify you search’ principle that iStockphoto has. With a new ‘algorithm’, Google will give every piece of information meaning, by tagging it. You can read the article on the Dutch geek-website ‘Tweakers’ by clicking the picture below (in Dutch).

tweakersarticlegoogle

In the next web, they claim, you can search for a bank and the browser can specifically tell what kind of bank you meant, by looking at your browser history, the use of programs on your PC and the files currently opened. In other words: Google is trying to get all the information from your computer to their databases, not even thinking to help you with something you simply don’t want. Do we let that happen?

Excessive amount of people hating chinese eh? Well Google does!

Posted in General, Problems by igortinbergen on April 8, 2009

Even when seeing this, people still question wether Google is the biggest search engine out there. There’s a ton of weird information out there about every subject. The suggestions Google makes when you’re searching for something can get weird results, as you can see in the movies below.

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Google to publishers: We’re not evil or illegal

Posted in Fun by astromanic on April 7, 2009

A day after the editor of The Wall Street Journal referred to online news aggregators–particularly Google and its Google News product–as “parasites or tech tapeworms,” and the chairman of the Associated Press announced an initiative to protect print media content from infringing use online, Google has fired back in a blog.google_china_6

The gist of Tuesday’s blog post, penned by Google associate general counsel Alexander Macgillivray: don’t point fingers at us.

“We show snippets and links under the doctrine of fair use enshrined in the United States Copyright Act,” he wrote. “Even though the Copyright Act does not grant a copyright owner a veto over such uses, it is our policy to allow any rightsholder, in this case newspaper or wire service, to remove their content from our index–all they have to do is ask us or implement simple technical standards.”

As for the AP, Macgillivray noted that Google already pays the wire service to reprint its articles and photographs. A dispute several years ago led to this agreement.

Of course, Google News is far from the only aggregator out there. Digg, Drudge Report, and the Huffington Post are also big players. But Google is unquestionably at the top.

For the past few years, as many mainstream media outlets (particularly on the print side) began to lose revenue, influence, and readership, some of them had a pretty clear message: blame Google. At the same time, Viacom still has a billion-dollar lawsuit against Google’s YouTube over pirated video content. And much of the publishing industry is far from signing on to Google’s book digitization initiative.

With struggling newspapers in a panic over whether offering content online for free might not have been such a good idea in the first place, Google–the ultimate source of free content–is an even easier target.

But Google says it’s part of the solution, not the problem, and insists that its search and aggregation products only serve to help drive traffic to online news sites.

“Users like me are sent from different Google sites to newspaper websites at a rate of more than a billion clicks per month,” Macgillivray said in his post. “These clicks go to news publishers large and small, domestic and international–day and night.”

( Cnet )

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Bad news for Google

Posted in Gadgets, General, Problems by igortinbergen on March 20, 2009

At the time, when Google Desktop Search is already competing with big players like Yahoo, MSN, AskJeeves, Gartner has just made the going even tougher.

Don’t use Google desktop search in your business, warns Gartner. Google Desktop Search has great potential for business use. Its security problems and lack of corporate-ready functions, however, make it unsuitable for widespread use right now.

googledesktop

Gartner has warned that companies shouldn’t use the new Google Desktop Search tool because of security concerns and a lack of features. In a three-page research document, the authors – Whit Andrews, Maurene Grey and David Smith – say the tool that was released in beta in October is “not the proper search tool for businesses right now”.

Instead they reiterate concerns put forward by the CEO of Google rival Copernic, David Burns, two months ago: “Google’s ‘Consent to Collect Nonpersonal Information’ states that GDS collects non-personal data; however, the policy is a one-sided contract in that the user must trust that Google will make the right decisions as to what it will collect.”

However, it also doesn’t offer enough features and for it to recommend Google it would want to see “greater customisation of interface, flexibility for visualisation of results, groupwide administration and index load-balancing”.

This is certainly not good news for Google at a time when its biggest competitor MSN desktop search is getting better reviews. Preston Gralla of Oreilly writes:

Google may be the ultimate Web searcher, but when it comes to finding things on your computer, the just-released beta of MSN Desktop Search beats it hands-down.

That’s because Microsoft’s search tool has been built specifically to search through emails and documents, and so it lets you fine-tune your search in ways that Google doesn’t. So if you’re looking for a specific piece of email, for example, you can search by folder, by sender, by date, by size of file attachments, and more – and you can combine them all for exceedingly fine-tuned searches.

Additionally, MSN Desktop Search has an interface that lets you easily sort and resort your results, and lets you right-click on any result, and then take actions on the file from a pop-up menu – the same pop-up menu that appears when you right-click in Windows Explorer.

There are a lot of other nifty extras in it as well. It can sit as a box in your Taskbar for example, and when you want to do a search, type your search into the box, and results pop up, menu-style. Click on any result to get straight to the file or email.

Google’s search tool, on the other hand, uses the Web search paradigm. You can fine-tune it in ways you would when searching the Web, but not in ways you’d like to when looking for files or email on your hard disk. The interface is bare-bones Google, which is fine for the Web, but not suited for when you’re looking for files, and then working with them on your PC.

Don’t expect either of these search tools to change drastically. Google has applied the Web approach to searching and applied it to your computer. Microsoft instead applied what it knows about Windows, Outlook, and documents. And the winner, without a doubt, is Microsoft.

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Hackers poison PCs that Google “March Madness”

Posted in General, News, Technics by henrydewaag on March 18, 2009

Cybercriminals have begun poisoning Google search results to misdirect sports fans looking to participate in March Madness festivities, security firms say. Websense has found poisoned “search engine optimization” results mixed in with legit results for Google searches on “March Madness schedule,” “March Madness brackets,” and “2009 NCAA bracket predictions.”

This story explains how poisoned SEO results can re-direct your browser to a website serving up all sorts of malicious programs. SEO attacks have become very popular with cyber gangs who specialize in redirecting you to online pitches to buy worthless antispyware subsctiptions for $50. Most often the bad guys will also turn your PC into an obedient bot, and steal all of your sensitive data.

“Cybercriminals specifically take advantage of events like March Madness, because they know consumers are actively looking for brackets to download, the best teams to fill in and pools to participate in,” said Carol Carpenter, vice president of consumer marketing for Trend Micro. “These crooks are smart and know what people are searching for throughout the year. We advise all consumers that they should always keep their anti-virus software protection up-to-date to prevent all infections.”

Good advice. But keeping your antivirus subcription current won’t fully protect you. The bad guys have gotten very good at staying one-step ahead of the latest antivirus updates.

To truly stay safe while surfing the Internet you need to do your homework and be ready to give up convenience. There are numerous consumer tools designed to assess the goodness of the Web page you are about to click to, and tell you whether it’s safe. AVG, ScanSafe, McAfee and Enigma have consumer web scanning tools and services worth checking out.

And here’s a tip: WinPatrol offers very powerful protection. It’s a terrific free tool, popular with techies since it was created 10 years ago by Bill Pytlovany, one of the original designers of AOL and a longtime open-source practitioner. The premier version, called WinPatrol Plus, costs just $30 for a lifetime subscription, which includes all updates, and is designed for the average consumer. WinPatrol takes a snapshot of your Windows run registry, and from then on blocks and alerts you to any new executable program, such as a malicious backdoor, that tries to install itself on your hard drive.

By Byron Acohido

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Google wants to have our information

Posted in Innovation, Web by whuup on March 14, 2009

Organize the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful.

The infamous Google mission statement is written above. We think it is just not anymore what we want Google must do. Google is already demanding individuals to share music listening history with Google. What is Google thinking? Why should we let them track, record, analyze, manipulate, archive and exploit our personal music listening habits? Google’s actions are far from innocent and always profit driven. Remember people: Google is a company, not a non-profit love-sharing organisation.

Google Privacy Blunder Shares Your Docs Without Permission

Posted in Problems by astromanic on March 7, 2009

googledocsimgIn a privacy error that underscores some of the biggest problems surrounding cloud-based services, Google has sent a notice to a number of users of its Document and Spreadsheets products stating that it may have inadvertently shared some of their documents with contacts who were never granted access to them.

According to the notice, this sharing was limited to people “with whom you, or a collaborator with sharing rights, had previously shared a document” – a vague statement that sounds like it could add up to quite a few people. The notice states that only text documents and presentations are affected, not spreadsheets, and provides links to each of the user’s documents that may have been shared in error.

I’ve contacted Google for confirmation and haven’t heard back, but this seems to be legit – our tipster says that he had previously shared the document listed in his notice, but now it has been reset to show 0 collaborators (one of the precautionary measures mentioned in the note).
Update: Google has confirmed that the note is real, and says that it was an isolated incident affecting less than .05% of all documents. The damage may not be widespread, but it’s still an unsettling lapse in security.

Here’s the letter in full:

Dear Google Docs user,

We wanted to let you know about a recent issue with your Google Docs account. We’ve identified and fixed a bug which may have caused you to share some of your documents without your knowledge. This inadvertent sharing was limited to people with whom you, or a collaborator with sharing rights, had previously shared a document. The issue only occurred if you, or a collaborator with sharing rights, selected multiple documents and presentations from the documents list and changed the sharing permissions. This issue affected documents and presentations, but not spreadsheets.

To help remedy this issue, we have used an automated process to remove collaborators and viewers from the documents that we identified as being affected. Since the impacted documents are now accessible only to you, you will need to re-share the documents manually. For your reference, we’ve listed below the documents identified as being affected.

We apologize for the inconvenience that this issue may have caused. We want to assure you that we are treating this issue with the highest priority.

The Google Docs Team

In short, this is a massive blunder on Google’s part. I fully appreciate the lengths Google has gone to to offer a wide array of helpful online services, many of which are free of charge. But this error highlights why cloud-based services scare many people. Regardless of what a site’s posted rules and policies are, a technical glitch is all it takes to expose your sensitive data.

Update: An affected user posted his story and the exchange he had with Google support over the issue on Slashdot.

Update 2: A Google spokesperson has confirmed that the note is real:

We fixed the bug, which affected less than 0.05% of documents, and removed any collaborators. We also contacted the users who were affected to notify them of the bug and to identify which of their documents may have been affected. We have extensive safeguards in place to protect all documents, and are confident this was an isolated incident.

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Gmail downtime takes hours, and it’s not the last time

Posted in Problems, Web by whuup on February 24, 2009

On several websites people discuss at the moment about problems with Gmail.

Has anyone else been experiencing this? I’ve never seen it down for this long before.
– yep, its been down for the last 12 hrs…couldn’t read and send mails. Now it’s completely down, won’t even login.
– I hope they have a VERY GOOD explanation…
– ok this is now beyond a joke…I am losing faith in Google…how can I trust Google again with my email with downtime now exceeding 15 hrs…and no sign or message as to when it’s ever going to come back up.

google404errorYou see, as people are starting to count on Google and it’s mail service, it is going to be very ugly when it’s down for more than a day. People are far too dependent on Gmail, and now they experience that Google is far from perfect. Tuesday’s Gmail outage left users seeing only a “502 server error” page when trying to login to the Web-based system. Word of the problem spread very fast via Twitter.

Enough said, I’m gonny read my mails with Outlook.

Google + typo = virus

Posted in Web by whuup on February 19, 2009

typogoogle1Internet REIT, a giant investor in domain names backed by leading private-equity investors, owns more than 30 addresses that are misspellings of Google or its product names, including googledearth.com, googleeardh.com and googleearthc.com. Those adresses can be used to spread malware, spyware and virusses. Since the virusmakers became really online-agressive and smart people, you can visit a malware website but think that you typed the address correctly. It’s another bad thing Google’s popularity is taken care of.

Internet REIT, a giant investor in domain names backed by leading private-equity investors, owns more than 30 addresses that are misspellings of Google or its product names, including Google Earth.

Boring couple loses case against Google – Evil is as evil does

Posted in Web by astromanic on February 18, 2009

THE COUPLE THAT sued Google claiming that the firm’s Street View represents an invasion of their privacy have lost their case.

Aaron and Christine Boring said that Google had “significantly disregarded privacy interests” when it photographed their house.They said having their home visible on Google’s Street View caused them “mental suffering” and asked for $25,000 in damagesBut a judge in the US District Court for Western Pennsylvania dismissed the case, saying the Borings “failed to state a claim under any count.”

Google said privacy no longer exists, what with all these new-fangled satellites in the sky and CCTV and what have you. And there’s nothing wrong with cars cruising the streets taking shots of people in their underwear, it said.

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Everyone Wants to Buy Yahoo, Nobody Wants to Buy AOL

Posted in Publications, Secret, Web by henrydewaag on February 12, 2009

And is there any wonder? Time Warner has been in talks with both Microsoft and Yahoo about selling off its AOL unit through out this year, but both companies have been much more interested in each other than the crumbled remains of AOL. Time Warner has showed a renewed interest in a deal and Microsoft and Yahoo continue to listen, but neither company appeared to be especially interested.

The NYTimes.com quotes Richard Greenfield, an analyst who covers Time Warner for Pali Capital, “I don’t see why anyone would make a move now with all the pieces on the chess board where they are,” he said. He adds that Time Warner was in a bad spot because the value of AOL was declining. (Doesn’t everyone want dialup?) Its main business is now selling graphical display ads and that is under pricing pressure. Greenfield also says its brand has a “toxic” connotation with consumers. The company does not even use the AOL name when it starts new web sites.

From its days as the evil empire of dialup companies, they earned the nickname ‘AOHell’. The company seemed to lack firm direction, buying various companies with no obvious connection to their business and often ruining them in the process. Perhaps the most famous of these is ICQ. The most popular IM program of the time was turned into bloatware, which quickly sank out of sight. Don’t even get me started on Netscape. AOL entered the portal ring way late and had already bled dialup users seeking the freedom of the internet compared to AOL’s own internal version of it. The company has been aimless and with its almost necrotic touch, is it any wonder consumers find the brand toxic?

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Google ex-employees launch search engine rival Cuil

Posted in Innovation, Technics by henrydewaag on February 7, 2009

A new search engine has been launched by some of Google’s former engineers, to rival their ex-employer’s market leading product. The engineers claim that Cuil can index, faster and more cheaply, a far larger portion of the web than Google can.

The new search engine says its service goes beyond prevailing search techniques that focus on web links and traffic patterns, instead analysing the context of each page and the concepts behind each user search request.

“Our significant breakthroughs in search technology have enabled us to index much more of the internet,
placing nearly the entire web at the fingertips of every user,” said Tom Costello, Cuil co-founder and chief executive.

According to Danny Sullivan, web search analyst and editor-in-chief of Search Engine Land, Cuil could exploit complaints that consumers may have with Google, such as the fact it tries to do too much, its results favour already popular sites, and that it leans heavily on certain authoritative sites, such as Wikipedia.

“The time may be right for a challenger,” Sullivan said. “Competing with Google is still a very daunting task, as Microsoft will tell you,” he added.

According to Anna Patterson, founder of Cuil and former architect of Google’s TeraGoogle index of web pages, Cuil has indexed a 120 billion web pages, three times more than what they say Google currently indexes. She also claims that the company has spent just £2.5 million developing the search engine.

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